Tierra Rejada Road

California Wild Rose FlowerThe City of Moorpark is committed to maintaining the natural beauty of its public spaces through sustainable landscape design that conserves natural resources. The latest example is along Tierra Rejada Road, where plans are underway to revitalize the landscaping between Spring Road and Courtney Lane.

Background

When the original landscape concept for Tierra Rejada Road was developed over 30 years ago, it envisioned a woodland meadow, with large evergreens, deciduous shade trees, and green meadows. While this vision created an enjoyable streetscape, it also resulted in a landscape that demands high water usage and is incompatible with site conditions in some areas. Today, the landscaping along this corridor is showing its age, with several tree species in decline and many areas in need of renovation.

The Project

The first phase of the Tierra Rejada Road streetscape revitalization project will begin in February, with the renovation of a 700-foot long section of Tierra Rejada Road, extending east from Mountain Meadow Drive.

The landscape design includes a varied mix of native and drought tolerant plant species that are adapted to the soils and climate of Moorpark. Once established, the streetscape will display varying heights, colors, and textures that will enhance the woodland meadow originally installed along Tierra Rejada Road, as well as reduce the water requirements for irrigation.

To further reduce water use, and enhance the long-term viability of the streetscape, water saving technologies such as point irrigation and drip irrigation systems will be installed throughout the project area.

Location Map Showing Tierra Rejada Road Near Mountain Meadows School

Share Your Comments

We welcome feedback from the community on this initial project area while we plan the remaining landscape redesign along Tierra Rejada Road. Please take a moment to share your comments with us.

Mock Orange Plant

The intent of the project, when completed, is for the Tierra Rejada corridor to exhibit a natural landscape that complements the mountain and foothill regions of southern California, while using up to 50% less water.